Category: Video


For all the diversity of the contemporary media ecology – network, broadcast, games, mobile – one technical form is entirely dominant. Screens are everywhere, at every scale, in every context. As well as the archetypal “big” and “small” screens of cinema and television we are now familiar with pocket- and book-sized screens, public screens as advertising or signage, urban screens at architectural scales. As satirical news site The Onion observes, we “spend the vast majority of each day staring at, interacting with, and deriving satisfaction from glowing rectangles.”

Continue reading

Advertisements

This second Video Vortex Reader marks the transition of online video into the mainstream. Staggering statistics of hypergrowth no longer impress us. Discussing a possible online video project for the first time in late 2006 in Melbourne with Seth Keen, the topic was still a matter of ‘becoming’. One collaborative research project, six conferences and two anthologies later, the Video Vortex project seems at a crossroads. Massive usage is not an indication of relevance. Heavy use does not automatically translate into well-funded research or critical art practices. Is the study of online video, like most new media topics, doomed to remain a niche activity – or will we see a conceptual quantum leap, in line with the billions of clips watched daily? So far, there is no evidence of a dialectical turn from quantity into quality. It is remarkable how quickly both pundits and cultural elites became used to online video libraries containing millions of mini-films. In our ‘whatever’ culture nothing seems to surprise us. Who cares about the internet? Continuous technological revolution, from social networking to smartphones, seems to have numbed us down. B-S-B: Boredom-Surprise-Boredom. Instead of an explosion of the collective imaginary we witness digital disillusion – a possible reason why online theory has had a somewhat unspectacular start. The low quality of YouTube’s most popular videos certainly indicates that this platform is not a hotbed of innovative aesthetics.

Continue reading

Mille Plateaux

Via Mille Plateaux‘s YouTube video collection.

 

Top 50 Internet Acronyms Parents Need to Know as decided by NetLingo, the internet dictionary.

Poetry in cyberspace. Virtual poetry readings. Post-poetry reading author events

Facebook is a universal connector, but its interpretation varies from culture to culture. Just look at the way each individual nation approaches the social network in its corresponding hit pop song.

Turkey


Zajmina Vasjari – Facebook

Serbia


Milan Stanković – Fejs (Face) [HQ]

Nigeria


ESSENCE FT JAY WON “FACEBOOK LOVE”

Colombia


Esteman – No te metas a mi facebook (oficial)

India


RUBY & CHIKAADEE – MY FACEBOOK

Bulgaria


Gergana – Facebook (Official Video) 2010

Spain


retosfritos – Facebook Reggaeton

Czech Republic


Nejfake – Český Facebook song – Official Videoklip HD

See more by Ryder Ripps

Removal from the Now

For Baudrillard, Walter Benjamin’s Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction has merely identified one symptom of a much wider phenomenon, the death of reality itself–or rather its vertiginous implosion into hyperreality.

Reality in the age of mechanical, electronic and digital reproduction has somehow been absorbed by its own hi-tech self representations.  In a Baudrillardian postmodern world, what counts as “real” is never more than a simulacral by-product of endless copies, fakes, replicas, and media illusions.

live video edits






“The proliferation of displacement and communications resources everywhere tears
us constantly from the here and now, with the temptation of being somewhere else
all the time. Grab a TGV29 train, take an RER30, pick up a phone, and you’ll already
be there. This mobility only implies a kind of constant being pulled away, isolation,
and exile. And it would be intolerable for people were not to always be a mobility of
private space, of a kind of portable “indoors.” The private bubble doesn’t burst; it
just floats. This isn’t the end of the cocooning, it’s just that it’s starting to get
moving. From a train station, an office park, a business bank, from one hotel to the
next, there’s always that foreignness, so commonplace, so well known that it feels
like the least familiar thing. The luxuriance of the metropolis is a random brew of
defined, infinitely permutable environments. Its downtowns offer themselves up not
as identical places but as original offerings of ambiances, among which we evolve,
choosing one and passing up another, like a kind of existential shopping among the
different styles of bars, people, designs, or iPod playlists. Advertising tagline: “With
my mp3 player I’m the master of my world.” To survive the surrounding uniformity,
the only option is to reconstitute your own inner world constantly, like children
building little Wendy houses (A back-yard children’s play-house, named after the house Peter Pan builds around Wendy Darling after she falls upon her arrival in Never-Never Land) just the same anywhere.”
The Coming Insurrection