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Reading Notes on Deleuze and Guattari  Capitalism & Schizophrenia

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Poetry in cyberspace. Virtual poetry readings. Post-poetry reading author events

Four loko has received more attention from its recent ban than it has in the five years its been sold.  With this new publicity sales have paradoxically increased.  Four Loko is flourishing from its demise.

I’ve collected images from social networking sites that demonstrate how american culture is dealing with the loss of Loko by making it a commodity fetish (object) and communal phenomenon.  Loko is receiving particular hype/mourning on the internet.

blue rasberry triangles

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This essay introduces an online experiment in the composition of scholarly hypertext that resulted in a website entitled The Arcades Project Project. My argument in favor of such endeavors begins with a discussion of “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” which I examine alongside “The Author as Producer” and “A Program for a Proletarian Children’s Theatre,” focusing on Benjamin’s distinction between progressive and regressive compositional and educational techniques.  In these essays, Benjamin identifies a way of thinking about progress that is “totally useless for fascism.”  This involves a refashioning of the apparatus of perception as a means of eliciting change. I argue that Benjamin makes this argument structurally in The Arcades Project by adopting passages as its title concept, providing an image of thought that lends itself easily to structural modification, improvisation and adaptation that is diffused throughout his structural apparatus.  In this way, The Arcades Project serves as an example of what Benjamin identifies as “the structure of awakening.” This concept of structure is then combined with the call by many Benjamin scholars to respond to his work, not through analysis and argument, but through continuation.  My response takes the form of this website.”

-Heather Marcelle Crickenberger

About

Flaneur

Facebook is a universal connector, but its interpretation varies from culture to culture. Just look at the way each individual nation approaches the social network in its corresponding hit pop song.

Turkey


Zajmina Vasjari – Facebook

Serbia


Milan Stanković – Fejs (Face) [HQ]

Nigeria


ESSENCE FT JAY WON “FACEBOOK LOVE”

Colombia


Esteman – No te metas a mi facebook (oficial)

India


RUBY & CHIKAADEE – MY FACEBOOK

Bulgaria


Gergana – Facebook (Official Video) 2010

Spain


retosfritos – Facebook Reggaeton

Czech Republic


Nejfake – Český Facebook song – Official Videoklip HD

See more by Ryder Ripps

Removal from the Now

For Baudrillard, Walter Benjamin’s Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction has merely identified one symptom of a much wider phenomenon, the death of reality itself–or rather its vertiginous implosion into hyperreality.

Reality in the age of mechanical, electronic and digital reproduction has somehow been absorbed by its own hi-tech self representations.  In a Baudrillardian postmodern world, what counts as “real” is never more than a simulacral by-product of endless copies, fakes, replicas, and media illusions.

Protocol: How Control Exists after Decentralization

by Alexander Galloway

“Is the Internet a vast arena of unrestricted communication and freely exchanged information or a regulated, highly structured virtual bureaucracy? In Protocol, Alexander Galloway argues that the founding principle of the Net is control, not freedom, and that the controlling power lies in the technical protocols that make network connections (and disconnections) possible. He does this by treating the computer as a textual medium that is based on a technological language, code. Code, he argues, can be subject to the same kind of cultural and literary analysis as any natural language; computer languages have their own syntax, grammar, communities, and cultures. Instead of relying on established theoretical approaches, Galloway finds a new way to write about digital media, drawing on his backgrounds in computer programming and critical theory. “Discipline-hopping is a necessity when it comes to complicated socio-technical topics like protocol,” he writes in the preface.

Galloway begins by examining the types of protocols that exist, including TCP/IP, DNS, and HTML. He then looks at examples of resistance and subversion—hackers, viruses, cyberfeminism, Internet art—which he views as emblematic of the larger transformations now taking place within digital culture. Written for a nontechnical audience, Protocol serves as a necessary counterpoint to the wildly utopian visions of the Net that were so widespread in earlier days.”

So far there is no Marxist theory of the media.

—Hans Magnus Enzensberger

live video edits





“Unbelievable but true! Baudrillard recites his poetry backed up by an all star band featuring Tom Watson, Mike Kelley, George Hurley, Lynn Johnston, Dave Muller and Amy Stoll, special guest vocalist Allucquère Rosanne Stone. Recorded live as part of the Chance Festival at Whiskey Pete’s Casino in Stateline Nevada, 1996. You’ve never heard Baudrillard like this before! Music to read Nietzsche to.”

 

notes, vocabulary

possible texture/flow for book of hyper-poetics

  • emergence of poetic space as a cyberspace, network of meanings, signified, language, situate a cyberspace into a poetic form


“The proliferation of displacement and communications resources everywhere tears
us constantly from the here and now, with the temptation of being somewhere else
all the time. Grab a TGV29 train, take an RER30, pick up a phone, and you’ll already
be there. This mobility only implies a kind of constant being pulled away, isolation,
and exile. And it would be intolerable for people were not to always be a mobility of
private space, of a kind of portable “indoors.” The private bubble doesn’t burst; it
just floats. This isn’t the end of the cocooning, it’s just that it’s starting to get
moving. From a train station, an office park, a business bank, from one hotel to the
next, there’s always that foreignness, so commonplace, so well known that it feels
like the least familiar thing. The luxuriance of the metropolis is a random brew of
defined, infinitely permutable environments. Its downtowns offer themselves up not
as identical places but as original offerings of ambiances, among which we evolve,
choosing one and passing up another, like a kind of existential shopping among the
different styles of bars, people, designs, or iPod playlists. Advertising tagline: “With
my mp3 player I’m the master of my world.” To survive the surrounding uniformity,
the only option is to reconstitute your own inner world constantly, like children
building little Wendy houses (A back-yard children’s play-house, named after the house Peter Pan builds around Wendy Darling after she falls upon her arrival in Never-Never Land) just the same anywhere.”
The Coming Insurrection

Is Poetry Enough? Poetry in a Time of Crisis

Reading Time: For a Poetics of Hypermedia Writing

Discussing the question of closure in hypertext fiction, George Landow wrote in Hypertext 2.0 (1997) that “[u]nlike texts in manuscript or print, those in hypertext apparently can continue indefinitely, perhaps infinitely” (191). Since the publication of Hypertext 2.0, experimental hypermedia has brought to the fore a new variety of open-ended literary works that both challenge and extend the typically link/node and word-based hypertexts to which Landow refers, such as Michael Joyce’s seminal hypertext story, Afternoon. (For online examples of word-based hypertext, see Joyce’s Twelve Blue and Judy Malloy’s LOve One.) A general survey of activities over the last four years reveals prominent changes not only in the way literary materials are composed but also in the tools of their distribution. Networked personal computers, coupled with advanced Web design software, provide a relatively cheap and easy mode of production and distribution not widely available before. As distribution machines, networked computers clearly change the relationship between author and reading public, most obviously in terms of the speed and range of distribution. Furthermore, new programming interfaces offer a whole host of gadgets–including animation, streaming video, vector motion, cascading styles, layering, and interactive behaviors–that together comprise some of the latest compositional tools of today’s screen-based writing. When put to use on the digital page, these devices alter the time of literary performance in ways significantly different from print-based, or even first-generation hypertextual, writings. Duration (scene progression, sequencing, real-time motion) is now built into the metalanguage of literary composition as a device, along with more conventional devices like line, paragraph, prosody, character, and plot. Moreover, the primary locale for this new performance, the World Wide Web, provides a zone of perpetual currency, or fleeting stability, or both (depending upon one’s perspective), which challenges conventional notions of the “past” and “present” of literary activity, in terms of the creative process as well as the distribution of a finished literary product. Three questions thus arise that will be treated throughout this essay: First, what are some of the ways in which computer technologies are currently used to create and distribute a time-based, hypermedia writing (with time-based defined for this study as hypermedia works whose “play” on the screen, either in whole or in part, is encoded into the work and computer-driven)? Second, how can time-based literary works of this kind be read in relation to traditional reading practices? Third, given the ephemeral nature of Web-based hypermedia, how might literary criticism in general accommodate this evolving art form?

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Fifteen Theses on Contemporary Art

“Get minky in the momodrome with Lara Glenum’s second book, MAXIMUM GAGA. In scenic Catatonia, the Normopath snoozles, the Cherubim applaud, King Minus lies face-down, the Visual Mercenaries burst in, Icky and his school-boy minions race past, and the Queen Naked Mole Rat climbs inside the miraculating machine. Reworking the tabloid maximalism of Jacobean drama, this book investigates the politics of aesthetics and prosthetics, gender and power.”
Lara Glenum

Lara Glenum

Manifesto of the Anti-Real

1. Art is neither a form of consolation nor a butler to hegemonies. Even in its most discreet moments, art explodes.

2. The Anti-Real does not deny the Real.* The Anti-Real knows that everything is in annihilation in the Sublime. The Anti-Real is that which seeks to manifest itself through the secret side-door to the Sublime rather than through the mock world of realism.

3. Realism is the bordello of those who would have their perceptions affirmed rather than dilated. When the door of fascism is opened, Realism will be seen lounging like a whore in its inner sanctum.

4. The Apocalypse is a way of thinking. Only the Apocalyptic clock announces from atop the grotesque pile of refuse, ‘The Kingdom of Heaven is now.’

5. Irony is not a device. It is a state of being.

6. To be Anti-Real is not to be Surreal. The achievement of Surrealism lies in displacing correspondences, in the poem not arriving. In the Anti-Real, all assumptions are disabled, too, with one difference: the Anti-Real displaces causal logic with a totalizing logic of violence.

7. ‘Defile! Defile!’ shriek the Obliterati as they vandalize the museum of language.

8. Sentimentality is a form of exploitation, a connivance with official lies. Hang sentimentality on the gallows of Emergency.

*Even though the Real does not exist

MAXIMUM GAGA

The Jew’s Daughter is an interactive, non-linear, multi-valent narrative, a storyspace that is unstable but nonetheless remains organically intact, progressively weaving itself together by way of subtle transformations on a single virtual page.

The Jew's Daughter
by Judd Morrissey